What colors do you use to get photoreal...

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pjmack15

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What colors do you use to get photoreal flesh tones. I used to know the answer to this however my latest work is far from what I used to produce. I have 2 Iwata Microns with a dual port Silair compressor. I am looking for the formula for flesh tones for portraits using transparent colors from Comart. Any help is greatly appreciated.

I start with Smoke grey, then add Sienna brown to add warmpth. Finally I use Ocre to tie up all the points.
 
Check out airbrushtutors tutorial on colour mixing and some of the other ones he does... that's a good start.
 
Airbrush tutor does help. He shoes opaques and transparents. I Use E'tac and don't premix any colour. I layer it all over each other
 
Isolate the colour you are trying to get, then spray test colours and put them side by side with out any other colour present.
Use complimentry colours to adjust tone.
Check out Steve Driscolls you tube on the wicked set
 
I have learned one thing there is not one mixture for flesh tone if you are doing realism While Steve has a com-art and a wicked set out there is still a lot of color mixing to get it to look right.
 
You have to treat picture individually, and match the tones specifically to that picture for true realism. I am not great at photo realism by the way, so take my opinion for what it is, a non expert one, but you have to treat it the same as you would any other colour, and match the medium, dark and lighter tones in the different areas of the face, and then blend them and fade them together where needed.. It may take several tries to get the colour matching right, and following Mitch's videos as suggested above will be a great help. He says in one of his vids it took him 17 tries to match one particular colour once, which made me feel a lot better about my own attempts, knowing I wasn't the only one lol.

Personally I use the steve driscoll flesh colour (which you can get as part of a set, but IMO the instructions that come with the set are only good for that particular painting ref that comes with it, so I just use the flesh tone it on its own) as a base mixture. I see how close it is to the mid tone of what I am working on, and adjust by adding more white or red or whatever, from there. Then play around til I can get it to match the darker and lighter areas too. I find it easier to have that as a starting off point rather than just starting mixing colour from scratch - but that's just me.
 
Everybody talks about flesh. I assume we're talking to caucasian in this case.

You know Copic markers has removed all reference to "flesh" from their colour range.
 
Have a read through the sbs section, @AndreZA amongst others has some great tutorials, look at his walter white thread, has some excellent tips and tecniques in it.
 
Everybody talks about flesh. I assume we're talking to caucasian in this case.

You know Copic markers has removed all reference to "flesh" from their colour range.
Yes I guess I shouldn't assume a particular flesh tone. And the driscoll flesh tone is def caucasian, I guess thats not politically correct. Are there flesh tones of other ethnicities? If not then someone is missing a trick there.
 
Yep. This comes up all the time. No need for recipes, learn how to match colors and the rest is history.
And in theory its easy :) just have to be willing to sacrifice paint to learn. i can match any colour now with confidence, it can take a few hours though!!!
 
And in theory its easy :) just have to be willing to sacrifice paint to learn. i can match any colour now with confidence, it can take a few hours though!!!
I used Createx to sacrifice paint while learning. It may spray like crap, but that doesn't matter when you're just matching colors.
 
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