What paint for car?

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alvin

Guest
What paint be better to paint cars or steel Auto Air or createx transparent ?
I'd like more createx becouse there're cheaper.
 
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Stranger375

Guest
For cars or any other hard surfaces Auto air or Createx Wicked would be much better then the normal Createx paints.
They are specialy made for that use and have a better grip on the metal surface and are also more durable against sunlight and everything.
 
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alvin

Guest
I was reading about normal createx and there was after painting make varnish coat for safe.
 
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Stranger375

Guest
On a car you should always use a 2K automotive clear, but usualy you are not able to spray that at home without having a paint shop.
Im no expert for this, but im not sure how the normal createx will work on a car, maybe someone of the other members already tried that.
 
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ProperlyStained

Guest
I'm with Stranger...You need a 2 part clear and AutoAir or Wicked are a much better choice over normal Createx. Don't try to go cheap on painting a car, it will show in the final results. Some artists will use waterbased paint just for the artwork, and heat set as they go... followed by a 2k urethane clear. If you want to paint the whole car with waterbased, you need a paint booth that can bake the paint, as far as I know.

For anything automotive, I personally only use solvent based paints. They spray much better, and because they don't need to be heat-set in a million dollar bake booth. My waterbased paints are for practice at home and for small things like guitars or motorcycle tanks that I can use a heat gun to set the paint. (I prefer solvent based, if given a choice)

As far as 2k clear...you can get away with spraying it in a garage, if you put up a make-shift paint booth to control ventilation and keep it clean. Be prepared for getting dirt and bugs in your paint though, you will need to color-sand and buff when you're done.
Keep in mind that I have only painted a couple cars and bikes... maybe some of the other members with more experience in the industry can shed some light on the subject.

Is this for you or a paying customer? And, are you painting the entire car, or just doing artwork on existing paint?
 
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alvin

Guest
I want to paint a wild boar on the door and then let the varnish.
I have garage only for this, clean and ventilated:D
I need only paints and tape :p
The varnish I want use this one http://www.elakiery.pl/prod/160,1168,1671,lakier-bezbarwny-400-ml-spray
in english: The hard and resistant to mechanical damage coating, dries quickly - from 5 to 8 minutes,
excellent adhesion to the substrate.



Universal in use - can be painted almost all surfaces such as wood, metal, aluminum, glass, stone and plastic surfaces
high performance - 400 ml cartridge is sufficient for a one-varnishing about 3 m2
safe to use
very good filling properties,
Super shine

Now I upload the pictures of my garage :D
 
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ProperlyStained

Guest
These are from Createx, they explain some things you need to know before buying anything...

-Createx Airbrush Colors™ are intended for interior application and require heat for final
curing. Wicked Colors™ are intended for both interior and exterior applications


-AutoAir Colors™ are meant to be top coated with a durable, urethane clear. Auto Air Colors™ are compatible with all urethane, waterborne and water-based paint systems. For use with lacquer and enamel paint systems, test first.



I want to start with explaining that I tell you this only because I have tried to do things like this without having the money it takes to do it the right way. When they say "meant to be top coated with a durable urethane", they mean it. You can't expect a single stage, general purpose paint to be the same as a high quality 2 part urethane. When they say "test first"on lacquer or enamel, it's because it could melt the paint on your car into mush. As far as the paint you left the link for...I've tried a lot of different spray paints and primers. Through trial and error, these are some of the things that have happened using general purpose paint instead of automotive grade.

-I have had hours and hours of airbrush work melt into nothing after I sprayed the spray-can clear.
-The area I cleared was twice as shiny as the paint around it and looked very unprofessional, so I color sanded and polished the rest, only to have a "halo", or foggy ring around the edge of the new clear.
-Other things looked fine at first but later, the clear turned yellow and cracked on top of my artwork.
-I've had to pay out of my own pocket to start over from bare metal, after the three different paints(the paint on it and my artwork, and my clear) reacted chemically and turned into a soft, wrinkled, sticky, mess.(again hours of airbrush work, wasted)
-I have tried a bunch of different brands, and have even put things in my oven at home to heat set the paint, in the end it was never as good as I wanted. There is a reason that professional custom painters, or even auto repair shops don't use spray-cans. I'm not saying it's impossible to get good results with them, but it's more likely that it could go wrong.

Eventually, after ruining enough things, I found someone to let me use there autobody equipment to do it the right way. That is what I meant by shooting clear in a garage... with a full size spray gun, and 2 part clear. Now, if I can't do it myself, I take it to a local paint shop and have it cleared by them with a good paint. Besides it never hurts to show them that you can airbrush.;)

I don't want to sound rude, honestly, but if you want the car to look professional and have it last a long time, you have to use automotive grade products and equipment... that paint you showed is meant for small objects like a mailbox or lawn furniture that you can cover the entire piece...not an area on a car. And it's not a quality urethane, so it may react badly. It may seem expensive to use "the good stuff" or to pay to have it cleared by a shop, but it's really the only way to be sure you'll get great results every time. A nice paint job will give you a reputation in your area...so will a bad one.

In my experience, if you want high quality results, you need to use high quality products and equipment. You can get away with cheap paint on things around the house that you want to airbrush, and it gives you an idea of what your work could look like if it were done on a bike or car... but it's not intended for quality automotive work. There are a few high end paints that come in a spray-can, but they are quite expensive and all are intended for smaller projects than a car.

Again this is intended as a warning, not an insult. I see you heading down a road I know very well, lol.:smile-new: I'd check with a local paint shop and see what they would charge you to clear coat of the entire car, once you've airbrushed it. You may even get some airbrush work...
 

RebelAir

Air-Valve Autobot!
Have to agree with Properlystained..For me the best product to paint a car is one designed to paint a car, taking nothing away from createx/auto air but for me they kind of try to be best of both worlds, of course a million and one top quality jobs have been done with such but they can take a decent learning curve to get right when using such, chemical reactions can be a nightmare..For me I like dedicated auto paints, keeping with the same type all the way through the job if possible..Another good thing about auto paint is that you generally buy it in a litre or more and when reduced will last you for ages and gives you heaps of base to mix other colors up, trying to do a whole cars artwork in smaller bottled pre-packaged type paints is a pain when ya run out of a color or mix half way through. LOL...GL with it
 
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ferret

Guest
Ok here goes Fact time most paint manufactures make automotive water based paints which are applied to all new cars .This is due to the rule changes on VOC allowed .These are then coated with 2k clear coats that have been adjusted to be compliant as far as VOC is concerned .Yes in an ideal world a booth application is best for total resprays .However it can be done in other ways .Water based automotive paints do not need to be baked and they are actually cured by air movement which dries them to a matt finish .there are also a lot of 2k clears coats that are air dry specific and can be flat and polished in 30 mins .I have to agree with ACE as far as using systems designed for the purpose .In europe with all the standards and environmental issues concerning VOC levels the time is getting closer to a big enforcement of the rules to stop the use of solvent based products .This is why the makers are all striving to produce better water based paint systems which will filter down to air brush use in the future .
 
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alvin

Guest
Thank you for your information is very important to me. Do not take offense for helpful information, including telling me that something goes wrong, it motivates me to action.
Soon I'll try to explain the effects of the cars.
 

Squishy

Queen Clown Slayer
I paint motor bikes and I use an outomotive base colour, then the artwork is done with Wicked/Wicked Detail, and then cleared with 2K clear. I would say that the createx colours are possibly for interior use as they aren't lightfast/uv resistant and so will fade, and if you are painting a car door, then 2k is going to be a lot tougher and less likely to get damaged with knocks.
 
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ProperlyStained

Guest
Ok here goes Fact time most paint manufactures make automotive water based paints which are applied to all new cars .This is due to the rule changes on VOC allowed .These are then coated with 2k clear coats that have been adjusted to be compliant as far as VOC is concerned .Yes in an ideal world a booth application is best for total resprays .However it can be done in other ways .Water based automotive paints do not need to be baked and they are actually cured by air movement which dries them to a matt finish .there are also a lot of 2k clears coats that are air dry specific and can be flat and polished in 30 mins .I have to agree with ACE as far as using systems designed for the purpose .In europe with all the standards and environmental issues concerning VOC levels the time is getting closer to a big enforcement of the rules to stop the use of solvent based products .This is why the makers are all striving to produce better water based paint systems which will filter down to air brush use in the future .


I appreciate the info ferret, I had been under the impression(just from a video or two, and word of mouth) that the new automotive water based all needed to be baked. I thought that was the give and take of loosing the solvents... I've never been around a full waterbased paint-job being applied. I think part of my confusion is because I was recently talking with the paint guys I know with a local shop, they have just bought a new bake booth, and the conversation of the new water based paints they were going to try came up at the same time...I thought they were directly connected.

Again, thanks for clearing that up. I hate to be the one spreading misinformation.
 

RebelAir

Air-Valve Autobot!
Hell I say if I wanna kill myself with a juicy mist of solvents then its my choice LOL....Can understand that the powers to be of course have my best interest at heart and only wanna tax my cigarettes instead LOL..Silly bureaucrats....They need a damn day job....LOL
 
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topangler81

Guest
use solvent base paint and 2k high solid clear. but dont use cheap one. some of my friends use cheap 2k clear but it only last for 3-4 month only.
 
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