Would this be a good idea?

R

Robert Kuzmeski

Guest
So, the Master G44 airbrush I purchased is really letting me down. Two broken tips and a bent needle, handled with great care, in a 2-3 week period. The tips had threading problems and when they started to go on wrong, I unscrewed them. The threads stayed in the main brush, however.

I purchased a Badger Sotar 20/20 for the price on Amazon. My understanding is that it's not a great newb airbrush but I figured over time, I could get better and start using it. I've decided that I don't just want to do modelling....I want to try my hand at traditional art.

Given that I have only a .5 tip for the G44 and don't trust them a ton to buy new ones, I am considering a Badger Krome 2-in-1. I figure since I have to buy an adapter for the 20/20 anyway, I might as well stick with the Badger line. That and the 20/20 is really comfortable. So...as a newbie, should I get the Krome to learn with or is the 20/20 going to be what I need?

Thanks,

- netgeist
 
Yes, that would definitely be a good idea, I'm guessing you've learned lesson and now your thinking like someone with experience, it's a shame your G44 let you down and cost you money, but at least now your mentioning a real name and one which serve you well and actually save you money in the long run, Badger are known for customer care so even if a problem crops up, help is always at hand.

So go for it and have fun:thumbsup:
 
And it's not a total waste. I bought the kit, so I have a lot of Wicked paint, a compressor and a cleaning kit.

Any other thoughts? Opposing view points?

- netgeist
 
If you're thinking you might not want to use the Sotar, can you return it to Amazon and put that money toward a Krome?
I made the same mistake buying a cheap brush the first time. It only took me about a week of using it before I ordered my Krome.

You may want to do a little research before using that cleaning kit, if it is the set of wire brushes, I've heard they are bad to use in your airbrush.
 
Great idea, Helio. I want the Sotar, though. I really want to give art a try once I learn more.

I wish I could get Master to replace the tips and needles. I emailed TPC but got no response...not even a point in the right direction.

- netgeist
 
Great idea, Helio. I want the Sotar, though. I really want to give art a try once I learn more.

I wish I could get Master to replace the tips and needles. I emailed TPC but got no response...not even a point in the right direction.

- netgeist

Forget the master and go with your plan, it will save you a lot of headaches in the long run, some people can get lucky with cheapies, but when the problems start they rarely ever stop, you can tinker and tinker constantly or simply enjoy the journey with a reputable brand name, the Krome is a respected brush and the sotar is a worthy follow up when you get the hang of it.

And as mentioned, be careful with the cleaning kit, check out tutors airbrush maintenance vid before you go stripping stuff, that will also save you some headaches.
 
First of all congrats on the Sotar and I'm sure you'll love the Krome but I have to ask did you use the wrench on the Master g44?
If so that was the problem. I have the same brush by Point Zero and everything is only finger tight.
I feel they are good brushes that lack the "polishing" to make them very good brushes
I did I lot of deburring, honing, polishing and lapping to mine and it works extremely well.
If you decide to keep the g44 and need any advice bringing it up to snuff, let me know.
You can remove the stripped threads in the body of the brush with an exacto knife, insert and unscrew (AndreZ's idea not mine)

Jim
 
I haven't used the Krome or Sotar but to me they look similar in uses. I would look more towards the 100LG with medium head for general painting. The Sotar is for fine work. If someone that's used these brushes could confirm (or shoot down) my thoughts.

I bought the Iwata hi line as my first decent brush. I was very happy with it for detail but general painting was taking way too long. I ordered the HPCS the week after. With both brushes painting is much faster and more enjoyable.
 
Hello and welcome to the madness. I did allot of research about everything to do with airbrushing. I'm a newbie but all the research I've done says do not use wire brush the put mini scratches on everything. You should use enter dental brushes they are soft but still do the job. You can use pipe cleaners as well.
 
I am not familiar with Badger brushes, but if you already have a sotar, why not just dive in and use that? You have a fairly steep learning curve as a newbie anyway, and what ever brush you use, it will take some time and experimentation with air pressure and paint ratios to find your happy place, and then get to grips with technique, so why not do it with the brush you already have, rather than spend more money? People go on courses who have never airbrushed before and use microns (granted they have an expert on hand to advise them, but that's what we're here for :) ), a good quality brush will take away all the wondering about "is it me or the brush" that isn't right. As you learn to airbrush, you will learn what works best for your brush. The more you learn, the more you will get out of it in terms of detail etc, and you won't outgrow your airbrush if you have a better quality one to start with.

A lot of people on the forum have the Krome and would certainly recommend it, it's pretty popular, but I think you already have a good brush right there, so IMO I would use that. Badger users may have different opinions though, and there is always the fact that it has the 2 in 1 option.
 
JCD....I did hand tighten, yes.

Hangs...I've also read that the Sotar is best for fine work

Kasey...I did too, but chose to look up how to paint minis. I had no idea to look up maintenance info until the trouble began.

Squishy...because I have read the Sotar can clog a bit if you're not good with paint ratios, mostly. I want a more forgiving brush until I get better.
 
Squishy...because I have read the Sotar can clog a bit if you're not good with paint ratios, mostly. I want a more forgiving brush until I get better.

Don't buy a chrome then or any airbrush really LOL, they all clog unless ya good with paint ratios and the chrome wont be an exception. Its a higher end brush and one that many will highly praise as a detail gun, not really a learners gun but not saying don't, thats your choice and no doubt you may find it the answer to your desires but I'm with Squish. learn the sotar, learn reduction, when your got the grips on that, consider a new brush..

Oh and to throw in an opinion, try a patriot or 150 or 155.. The first two are good learner guns, the latter needs a bit more experiance but is a cheaper option and requires no needle changing as it is also a 3-1 set-up, but does require more trigger control..good luck with whatever ya decide..
 
I did buy the Krome. Everything I've read has it as a much better learning brush. I'll have the Master, Sotar and Krome...so I should have a good arsenal to work with a lot of stuff.

I'd love to see the maintenance video and have looked/searched on airbrush tutor. No luck finding that one though. Anyone have a link?

Thanks again,

- netgeist
 
Here ya go
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