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Ya know what I'd like to see?

Discussion in 'Airbrushes' started by Johnny, Apr 2, 2021.


  1. Nessus

    Nessus Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Don't need to spend anywhere near that much. Like I said: doesn't need to be a super expensive high-end brush. Just needs to clear the floor for reliability.

    My HP-CS was under $100, because I got a refurbished classroom brush instead of a new one. Badger brushes go for less even new: they're not as easy to clean as Iwatas, but they spray well.

    A used brush from a reputable seller is better than a new brush from an iffy one.

    And like I say: If you're even thinking you might upgrade later if it works out, that's enough to tip the scales and make it cheaper to just buy the "upgrade" first. Only reason not to is if you're anticipating an upgrade in your financial status. Otherwise that same money is gonna be coming out of the same budget situation regardless of when.
    Carnun and jord001 like this.
  2. Electric Cat Dude

    Electric Cat Dude Gravity Guru

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    My personal opinion is that if you’re really interested in doing airbrushing, you should buy a good quality airbrush, not necessarily the most expensive ones, that will be reliable and functional for your intended use. Most of the well-known lines will do that quite well i.e. Badger, Paasche, entry Iwata brushes, Aztek, etc. All of these brands will deliver good, reliable results.
    jord001 and Nessus like this.
  3. AndreZA

    AndreZA Love this place! Forum Supporter Very Likeable!

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    I did not read all the comments so this might have been said already.

    An experienced user will most likely be able to use a cheap gun with better results than an inexperienced painter does with an expensive gun. For me it has always been that the art is tough enough to master, no need to struggle with the tools as well. Get a good gun, get good paint. Get good instruction. And if you do not like the hobby and you want to get rid of the tools, good ones will be easier to sell than not so good ones.
    jord001 likes this.
  4. twood

    twood Air-Valve Autobot! Very Likeable!

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    In Canada, even a Badger Patriot is $150....plus tax. I picked up the aztec for $25. Not everyone lives in the States. And if I were to buy online, I still have to pay the conversion and shipping. If it wasn't for that Aztec, I never would have gotten in this hobby. I am not saying that you need a cheap brush to learn everything from, just to see if this hobby is worth the investment in the future. It is not a cheap hobby.
    jord001 likes this.
  5. Johnny

    Johnny Double Actioner

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    ...and you were only able to barely put out stick figures prior to this? Me thinks you're being too modest.
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  6. JackEb

    JackEb The Dragon Hunter Staff Member Admin

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    Ok, I could do a recognisable stick figure but that was truely my limit. I’ve done a lot of crafts and yes I’m creative but never considered myself artistic. It was only by reading all the great posts here and taking onboard all the advice and tips and tricks that I progressed and continue to progress. The reason I posted it was because
    1) you asked to se early work with a ‘cheap’ airbrush
    2) you said you had no artistic ability. So I posted to show you that you don’t need to have any sort of art background to get enjoyment out of an airbrush.
    I can guarantee you that we are not the only two to pick up an airbrush despite having no artistic ability. It will come, just takes time :)
    Johnny, jord001 and twood like this.
  7. jord001

    jord001 Air-Valve Autobot!

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    When I started I hadn't a clue. My mate who taught me had a badger 100 I think and maybe 150, it was a long time ago. I don't know what they cost in the 80's but I don't remember any "budget" airbrushes being available. If there was I wouldn't have known where to get one, No internet! I brought an Aztek 3000 from an art shop in Birmingham which I can remember was on sale and I paid £109 back then, so certainly wasn't budget (it was a months pay) but still not the most expensive, it was what I could afford at the time.
    I did buy some cheap airbrushes later on and although I had some experience they were hard to keep working consistently. Early on I had a couple of badger clones from everything airbrush and they were, shall we say, not great. I went back to my Aztek and gave them away. I also brought one like the point zero with the built in mac and C cup, mine is branded Fraulein. When it works it is quite good however it would randomly block and not work so now it sits in my box unused. I do see both sides of things, however, now whatever I am getting into, or fancy having a go at, I do lots of research before hand ( doing research at the moment for 3d printers and metal working lathes) I can say I wont be going budget on those but not the top of the range.

    Johnny, these were my first 2 airbrush attempts with the Aztek

    4.jpg

    Image036.jpg



    Lee
  8. Johnny

    Johnny Double Actioner

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    You guys can at least draw. I cannot draw, so I wonder if I should abort.

    Ponz
  9. DaveG

    DaveG Airbush Analyst Very Likeable!

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    You on FB? I have a few albums that may be of help deciding ho to approach things. There are also some kits available in the form of School of Realism Classroom in the box sets that help teach application methods that could potentially aid in getting round having the ability to draw a stick figure.

    In the event you can see it, here is a link to a step by step I did on how I painted a skull - https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1253228414782744&type=3

    skull.jpg

    and this was my stab at one of the classroom in the box kits - There is enough online instructional content included with this eye kit that even a person using an airbrush for the first time can get to a point where they can pull this off. You will start off with a monochromatic version using the included supplies... (you'll note this one was done with one of the import brushes)

    blair eye1.jpg

    Available at - Blair School of Realism - https://www.schoolofrealism.com/collections/all-kits
    Johnny likes this.
  10. JackEb

    JackEb The Dragon Hunter Staff Member Admin

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    No, I could not draw, that’s why I posted my picture, it was done with no artistic talent apart from stick figures.
    I could possibly draw a little better now (11 years later) but I haven’t tried.

    You don’t need to be able to draw to produce something recognisable!

    Your skills will improve over time
    Johnny likes this.
  11. DaveG

    DaveG Airbush Analyst Very Likeable!

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    What I really meant to say, is that it really isn't about the ability to draw - it is more about the skill acquired in applying the paint. There are gobs of tricks for getting around the actual drawing part ;)
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  12. JackEb

    JackEb The Dragon Hunter Staff Member Admin

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    extremely well explained Dave !! :thumbsup:
  13. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Staff Member Admin Very Likeable!

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    I forget which pro said this but you don't have to know how to draw to learn to airbrush . While being able to is a plus a lot of the pros trace or project their image and paint. Just think kids coloring book.
    Johnny likes this.
  14. JackEb

    JackEb The Dragon Hunter Staff Member Admin

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  15. Johnny

    Johnny Double Actioner

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  16. Karl Becker

    Karl Becker Mac-Valve Maestro! Very Likeable!

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    I get what you are looking for. You don't want to invest money into something that may not work out and want proof that it's possible it can. I can't draw to save my life. I'm nowhere near the talent level of most of the artists here, which is fine. I came into this knowing and accepting that, so I'm just having fun with it hoping I get better at some point.

    If you look at my gallery, every one of those, with the exception of the cat and the Ram was done with a cheap Master Airbrush. For the ram, I was still using cheap paint, and for the cat, I upgraded to better paint, but still not the right paint for the job. For me, it was more about learning technique and control. After upgrading my brush and paint, things got easier. I still have a lot to learn, but using other tools and techniques learned along the way have made painting more satisfying, at least to the point that I don't feel like I'm wasting my time and money.

    It's a personal decision, but I don't think "I can't draw" is a good enough reason to give up on it. The real question is are you enjoying doing it?
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