For Every Airbrush Artist!

Want to see more forum, less google ads ? Then register for free

Register

What chemistry is going on in this video?

Discussion in 'Paints' started by Nessus, Jan 7, 2021.


  1. Nessus

    Nessus Needle-chuck Ninja

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    338
    Trophy Points:
    61
    Location:
    San Diego


    This looks useful, but I'd love to know more about what kind of interaction actually causes the effect, so that I could more freely replicate it with other paints instead of being limited to a specific brand.

    Thanks!
    erwin de pan likes this.
  2. markjthomson

    markjthomson AKA QuickDraw and very happy #nobrushleftbehind Staff Member Admin

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2014
    Messages:
    7,855
    Likes Received:
    7,848
    Trophy Points:
    126
    Location:
    Auckland New Zealand
    OK so she talks about a 50/50 chance of getting the reaction so it isn't something that is "designed" to react in this way. It is a similar looking reaction to the "hammertone" paints used on many industrial tool applications. Think lathes, vices, etc back in the '80's. It's a fish eye issue. Typically it is a "defect".

    So she starts with Createx (primarily a fabric paint, need a large needle to get it through the brush) then putting the wicked on top. INteresting the Tech Data states they are compatible. Check under "Technical" on this webpage. https://creatextech.com/
    Nessus and LadyCharlie like this.
  3. Kim McCann

    Kim McCann Mac-Valve Maestro! Very Likeable!

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Messages:
    281
    Likes Received:
    719
    Trophy Points:
    91
    It's really just a reaction based on paint reduction and a wet on wet technique. You can even get this with traditional brushes and at certain humidities.

    Try laying down a thick layer of a lighter color, plenty wet. Then go over top with a thick layer of a darker color, also wet. You'll find that the edges of where they meet will bleed in that acid wash kind of effect.

    Specific paint chemistry isn't really what is going on here. Rather it is the consequence of bleeding color in a wet on wet application.

    People that do acrylic pours use this technique all the time.

    Sent from my SM-N981W using Tapatalk
    Nessus, HellBird, LadyCharlie and 3 others like this.
  4. jord001

    jord001 Air-Valve Autobot!

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2012
    Messages:
    6,750
    Likes Received:
    6,057
    Trophy Points:
    126
    Location:
    Birmingham UK
    Your right Mark, they are supposed to be compatible and probably are when they are fully cured. She is spraying wet on wet which must be the caveat as well as maybe the different viscosities of the two separate paints to the acid drop effect.
  5. twood

    twood Air-Valve Autobot! Very Likeable!

    Joined:
    May 10, 2013
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    3,834
    Trophy Points:
    126
    Location:
    Glen Morris, Ontario, Canada
    She is pooling the paint on...No fancy trick...just an effect...I have done this when I didn't know any better...lol
    LadyCharlie, markjthomson and jord001 like this.
  6. jord001

    jord001 Air-Valve Autobot!

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2012
    Messages:
    6,750
    Likes Received:
    6,057
    Trophy Points:
    126
    Location:
    Birmingham UK
    Looks good though
    markjthomson likes this.
  7. wickedartstudio

    wickedartstudio Mac-Valve Maestro!

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2012
    Messages:
    810
    Likes Received:
    742
    Trophy Points:
    91
    Location:
    Stillwater, Oklahoma
    The technical term for what she's doing is pigment migration. Early on, after Auto Air Colors and the Wicked line were introduced, this was a common issue anytime you put too much paint down or used a wet coat (it was a bigger issue for those of us that were used to spraying urethane). The paint would migrate, just like the video shows, and form what looks like little fish eyes. Most view this reaction as a mistake (although it was very easy to repair). I've used this same reaction intentionally for years to create texture.

    Over the years Createx has refined their paint formulations in order to make them perform better in the custom automotive environment. Due to those improvements, causing pigment migration is actually harder to do now than it once was. Createx Airbrush Colors are intermixable and compatible with all of the other Createx lines (Auto Air, Wicked, Wicked Detail and Illustration); however, the Airbrush Colors line was designed for fabrics and textiles as Mark said above. They have worked flawlessly for decades for that purpose and they are not recommended for automotive applications. Based on that, the Airbrush Colors line hasn't been changed over the years like the others have.
    Nessus, Karl Becker, jord001 and 2 others like this.
  8. Nessus

    Nessus Needle-chuck Ninja

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    338
    Trophy Points:
    61
    Location:
    San Diego
    Thanks, all! It's not a mode of the paint failure I've had personal experience with, so I didn't recognize it.

    The info you guys provided gives me solid directions for experimentation. I can already think of a few simple things to try that might help make it more repeatable, adaptable to other/any paint, and hopefully with thinner coats. I mean, not as thin as regular: it sounds/looks like the lower coat needs to be a wet "sea" for this to happen, just a reduction in how much it might fill in or distort topographical detail ('cause I'd be using it for model painting).
    jord001 and twood like this.

Share This Page